Tag Archives for : statelessness

Interviews

The Win Making a Difference

  • May 18, 2017

A guest post by Lisa Winterfeldt Can you imagine if you didn’t have documentation for the country where you were born? Imagine if you didn’t have citizenship and therefore you were limited in where you could travel, what you could study, what job you could pursue. You are a child with dreams to study to become a doctor or lawyer, but.

Read More
Thoughts

The Costs of Sex Trafficking

  • April 6, 2017

When we talk about child victims of the sex trade, the moral costs are clear: no child should fall prey to sexual predators. That message alone should provide the rallying cry to end trafficking and exploitation, however, what it doesn’t say is that society bears costs as well. The focus is on the effect on victims and their families—as it.

Read More
Thoughts

Climate Change And Child Trafficking

  • February 23, 2017

This post is part of a series called “Let’s Get Intersectional” where we highlight all the ways in which trafficking is related to other industries and areas of concern. From economic development to minority rights, mental health issues to terrorism, human trafficking affects and is affected by a wide variety of concerns—and to tackle one area means to grapple with.

Read More
Interviews

A Conversation with Filmmaker Heidi Burkey

  • January 19, 2017

As an NGO that initially began as a film project and a documentary, The Freedom Story (formerly The SOLD Project), has been in a unique position in being a part of the conversation and change in collective understanding about how to engage with difficult topics and underprivileged communities. Where before, NGOs and documentaries would show heart-wrenching tales and images to drive.

Read More
Interviews

Field Report: A Special Trip for Kids Who Can’t Travel

  • December 1, 2016

International law defines statelessness as a lack of citizenship. In Thailand, many people born near the borders of Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, or in hill tribe villages lack documented citizenship and are therefore considered stateless. Without citizenship, they do not enjoy the same rights as others, even if they were born and have lived their entire lives in Thailand. As one might expect, this means they.

Read More