Category Archives for : Thoughts

Thoughts

The One Thing You Need to Do to be Your Kid’s Hero

  • January 20, 2016

January is both Anti-Trafficking Month and National Mentoring Month, and at The SOLD Project we try to do both! We help children avoid exploitation by trying to make sure they feel like they always have someone they can turn to for help, for guidance, for support, and friendship. We try to model good and respectful behavior, of course, but also.

Read More
Thoughts

The Gift of Giving for the Holidays

  • December 2, 2015

The holidays are almost upon us and if you’ve been considering ways to support the fight against child trafficking, the reduction of global injustice, or simply helping young children desperate for a chance to make the most of their dreams, now is a great time to do so. You can join in and give on your own behalf, or as.

Read More
Thoughts

A guest post by SOLD staff member, Cameron Allen

  • November 3, 2015

After being a part of The SOLD Project in many different ways over the past five years, I have finally held some discussions and a fundraising event with some of my friends and family to spread the word about this great organisation. The incredible news is…They have responded. Personally I have always found it a little difficult to ask people.

Read More
Thoughts

The Importance of Research

  • September 11, 2015

A guest post by SOLD’s intern, Bunty Drewitt, reflecting on what she has learned during her tenure with us. As I approach the last days of my internship at SOLD, I have begun to reflect on my work here and draw some conclusions. My main assignment at SOLD was to help SOLD prepare to enter the research world of human.

Read More
Thoughts

Dream

  • September 8, 2015

Dream is aptly named, for among our students, she is the one who has dared to dream the biggest. When I first started working with SOLD in 2011, I asked all the students what they wanted to be when they grew up. Almost all of them said either teacher or nurse, and the lack of variety in their response showed.

Read More
Thoughts

The Surprising Thing About Education

  • July 21, 2015

Photo credit: szefei/Shutterstock Imagine you are a subsistence level farmer living in a rural village more than an hour’s drive away from the nearest city of any notable size. You grow tamarind and collect recyclables to sell on the side for the money to buy a few more meals. You have less than six years of schooling, which is more.

Read More
Thoughts

How Would You Teach a Teenage Boy to Respect Women?

  • July 13, 2015

While poverty, lack of education, lack of citizenship status, and other aspects of family history are among the most important “hard” reasons why trafficking happens and to whom, a culture of undervaluing women is often cited as one of the most important “soft” reasons — and thus one of the most amorphous, difficult to pin down, and resistant to change..

Read More
Thoughts

The Risk it Took To Blossom

  • June 5, 2015

Laughter echoes through the doors, music thumps in the background, smiles and wais greet me as I step into the classroom. This select group of elite students waits patiently as we set up for my Powerpoint presentation while many others mill around and play outdoors. When I ask for volunteers, hands shoot up in the air. When I ask them.

Read More
Thoughts

Prevention Through Communication

  • May 16, 2015

This past weekend we held one of our regular Parent Meetings, where we invite families to come with their students and participate in our communal activities. These Parent Meetings are designed to help families keep abreast of developments at The SOLD Project, get to know some of our various staff members, and engage in conversations meant to facilitate communication between.

Read More
Thoughts

Why We Support University Students

  • May 2, 2015

When asked why The SOLD Project supports university students, I was at first taken aback. The question seemed to come from the point of view that we’re here to combat child trafficking and university students are no longer children, so ostensibly resources should be focused solely on students who are underage. It’s an important question, and a great opportunity to.

Read More